Sankatamochan Hanumanashtaka 8 parts

Sankatamochan Hanumanashtaka
Part One Sankat Mochana, or the reliever of suffering, is one of the epithets for Hanumanji. In the Sankatamochan Hanumanashtak, written by the saint Tulasidas, there are eight verses which describe various episodes in Hanumanji’s life. Each one gives an example of how Hanumanji has used his great power to ease the pain of someone who was suffering. The first verse says: Baala samaya ravi bhakshi liyo Taba tinahu loka bhayo amdhiyaaro Taahi so traasa bhayo jaga ko Yaha sankata kaahu so jaata na taaro Devana aani kari binate taba Chhaamri diyo ravi kashta nivaaro Ko nahi jaanata hai jaga me Kapi sankata mochana naama tihaaro English translation: When you were a child, you swallowed the sun, plunging the three worlds into darkness. The worlds were in terror and no one could remove this distress. The gods came and entreated you and then you released the sun and ended the suffering. Who in this world doesn’t know, Monkey, that your name is Sankat Mochan, the destroyer of suffering?

This story is told in Valmiki’s Ramayana, the Ramacharitamanas of Tulsidas and in several of the Puranas. Here is one version: Once, as a young child, Hanumanji was extremely hungry. Looking around in the forest for something to eat, he caught sight of the rising sun. Mistaking it for a red fruit, he leapt into the sky to seize it. On that very day, the sun was to be swallowed by Rahu, the bodiless head of a serpent demon who causes the eclipse of the sun. Seeing Hanuman coming, the sun coursed through the sky, finally taking refuge in Indra’s heaven, followed by Rahu who complained to Indra that another Rahu had come to devour the sun first. Indra hurled his vajra (thunderbolt) at baby Hanuman and it hit him on the chin, sending him hurtling to the ground and giving rise to his name which means “One with the injured (mana) chin (hanu)” in Sanskrit. Vayu, the wind-god and father of Hanuman, was so angry at Indra for injuring his son that he sucked away all the air from the cosmos, leaving the universe at a standstill and causing panic and breathlessness on all planes of existence. The gods entreated Vayu to forgive them and promised to bless Hanumanji to overcome all difficulties with ease. Indra, lord of heaven, blessed Hanumanji that his thunderbolt could not harm him, Surya, the sun, gave him one-hundredth of his brilliance and promised to instruct him in all knowledge and the arts, Varuna, lord of the ocean, blessed him with immortality and said that no waters could harm him, Yama, god of death, blessed him with a life free of disease and death, Kubera, god of wealth, said that he could never fall in the battlefield, Shiva and Vishvakarma, the celestial architect, gave him immunity from various weapons and Brahma blessed him that he might destroy god’s enemies and be able to assume any form he chose. According to the Bhavishya Purana, even after being struck down by Indra’s vajra, Hanuman still held tight to the sun. The sun then started to shout for help and was heard by Ravana who came to free him and started pulling in vain on Hanuman’s tail. The struggle went on for over a year until Ravana was ultimately defeated and Hanuman began to beat him. Hanuman was finally pacified by the sage Visrava who arrived on the scene to rescue Ravana.
“When Sri Hanumanji in His childhood looks at the rising sun and leaps to get it, it is actually to satisfy his hunger of intellect. And what does that mean? The sun is the symbol of the light in which a human being attains the wisdom of Absolute Truth. The hunger for higher wisdom and truth inspired Sri Hanumanji to rise high up in the sky. Otherwise, he could have eaten many other fruits. The whole mountain was full of gardens and each tree was burdened with fruits and flowers. Sri Hanumanji was not tempted to eat them. He was only attracted upward to higher superiority, towards the expanding life of Cosmic consciousness…(When) you become able to develop a hunger of Soul, dedicating your life for something higher…then Hanumanji’s flight towards the sun has started in your life. Then you soar high in the sky of freedom, peace and love.” -Sri Swami Prem, “The Story of a Lovetrance Being”

Sources: Aryan, K.C. and Subhashini. Hanuman: Art Mythology and Folklore. Rekha Prakashan, New Delhi, 1994. Lutgendorf, Philip. Hanuman’s Tale: The Messages of a Divine Monkey. Oxford University Press, New York, 2007. Nagar, Shantilal. Hanuman: The Only Devotee. B.R. Publishing Corporation, Delhi, 2006. Pattanaik, Devdutt. Hanuman: An Introduction. Vakils, Feffer and Simons Pvt. Ltd., Mumbai, 2005. Prem, Sri Swami n.d. The Story of a Lovetrance Being. Aum Namo Bhagavate Vasudevay Foundation, Intergalactic Lovetrance Civilization Center, Harbor City, CA. Sri Neem Karoli Baba Maharaj Temple Prayers. Ajanta Press, Nainital.

Sankatamochan Hanumanashtaka Part Two
Sankat Mochana, or the reliever of suffering, is one of the epithets for Hanumanji. In the Sankatamochan Hanumanashtak, written by the saint Tulasidas, there are eight verses which describe various episodes in Hanumanji’s life. Each one gives an example of how Hanumanji has used his great power to ease the pain of someone who was suffering.
The second verse says:
Baali ki traasa kapisa basai giri
Jaata mahaaprabhu pantha nihaaro
Chaunki mahaamuni saapa diyo
Taba chaahiya kauna bichaara bichaaro
Kai dvija rupa livaaya mahaaprabhu
So tuma daasa ke soka nivaaro
Ko nahi jaanata hai jaga me
Kapi sankata mochana naama tihaaro

English translation:

From fear of Bali, king of the monkeys, Sugriva lived on a mountain. Sugriva knew that Bali could not come to that mountain because of the muni’s curse, yet he still lived in fear. Who else but you could find a solution to this? Seeing Sri Ram coming on the road, you took the form of a Brahmin and brought the Lord to Sugriva, relieving that servant’s suffering. Who in this world doesn’t know, Monkey, that your name is Sankat Mochan, the destroyer of suffering?

This verse refers to the allegiance between Lord Ram and the monkey Sugriva. Bali and Sugriva were brothers and Bali, the eldest, was king of the monkeys. Bali was a fierce fighter who loved a good battle. One night, the demon Mayavi came to the gates of the monkey city of Kishkinda and roared a challenge. Bali came forward to meet him, accompanied by his younger brother. On seeing Bali, the demon fled into a mountain cave. Before heading in after him, Bali told Sugriva to wait for him for a fortnight and that if he didn’t come out, to take him for dead. After a month of waiting, Sugriva saw a great stream of blood flow out from the cave and concluded that his brother had been slain. Fearing for his own life, he blocked the entrance to the cave with a rock and returned to rule over the kingdom. Not long after, Bali returned victorious and seeing his brother on the throne did not wait for him to explain himself. Bali beat Sugriva and took his wife Ruma. Sugriva then fled to the only place where he thought he might be safe-the Rishyamukh Hill. Bali could not set foot upon that hill because of an earlier curse by the Rishi Matanga. The father of the demon Mayavi was a demon named Dundubhi. He loved to fight and was told by Indra that only Bali would be his match in battle. He sought out Bali and challenged him. Bali eventually defeated him by tearing one of the horns from the demon’s head and attacking him with it. In his frenzy after slaying the demon, Bali swung the lifeless body and flung it as far as he could. It landed on Rishyamukh Hill on the sacrificial fire of the Rishi Matanga. The sage was so angry that he cursed Bali that if he ever set foot on that hill he would die.
When Ram and Lakshman entered the forest near where Sugriva was hiding, Sugriva sent Hanuman as a messenger to meet them. Hanuman brought the two brothers to Sugriva and they pledged to help one another to find Sita and to bring down Bali. Sri Ram assisted Sugriva in killing Bali and recovering his wife and throne, thus ending his suffering.
Sources:
Lutgendorf, Philip. Hanuman’s Tale: The Messages of a Divine Monkey. Oxford University Press, New York, 2007.
Prasad, R.C., Editor and Translator. Tulasidas’s Shriramacharitamanasa. Motilal Banarsidas, Delhi, 1990.
Schotsman, Irma. Hanuman in Valmiki’s Ramayana. Nag Publishers, Delhi, 2002.
Sri Neem Karoli Baba Maharaj Temple Prayers. Ajanta Press, Nainital.

Sankatamochan Hanumanashtaka Part Three

Sankat Mochana, or the reliever of suffering, is one of the epithets for Hanumanji. In the Sankatamochan Hanumanashtak, written by the saint Tulasidas, there are eight verses which describe various episodes in Hanumanji’s life. Each one gives an example of how Hanumanji has used his great power to ease the pain of someone who was suffering.
The third verse says:
Angada ke sanga lena gaye siya
Khoja kapisa yaha baina uchaaro
Jivata naa bachihau hama sau
Ju binaa sudhi laa-e ihaa pagu dhaaro
Heri thake tata sindhu sabai taba
Laaya siyaa-sudhi praana ubaaro
Ko nahi jaanata hai jaga me
Kapi sankata mochana naama tihaaro

English translation:

You went in search of Sita with Angada, who said, “We’ll forfeit our lives if we leave here without bringing news [of Sita].” Seeing them [the monkeys] all exhausted by the ocean’s shore, you then brought news of Sita and saved their lives. Who in this world doesn’t know, Monkey, that your name is Sankat Mochan, the destroyer of suffering?

When the monkeys all gathered before Sugriva, the monkey king, he said to them:

“‘Go, search for Janaka’s daughter and return, my brothers, within a month. He who comes back after that period without any news shall die at my hands.’ Hearing these words, and driven by Sugriva’s command, the monkeys set out at once in every direction. Sugriva then summoned Angad, Nala and Hanuman and said, ‘ Listen, O Nila, Angad, Jambavan and Hanuman, resolute and sagacious champions all, go you together to the south and inquire of everyone you meet the whereabouts of Sita. Let every thought and word and deed be applied to devising some ways of accomplishing Rama’s purpose. One must wait on the sun with one’s back turned towards it and on fire with the breast facing it; but a master must be served with one’s whole being, without any subterfuges. One must turn from things illusory (mine-ness and attachment) and be devoted to things spiritual, so shall all the cares connected with birth and death be destroyed. The consummation of human birth, brothers, lies in forsaking all worldly desires and worshipping Rama only.’

The monkeys searched everywhere and finally arrived at the southern seashore.

“Now the monkeys were thinking to themselves, ‘The appointed time has passed and yet nothing has been done.’ Sitting together, they all said to one another, ‘Brother, if we abandon our pursuit and return to the city without any tidings of Sita, what shall we do there?’ Said Angad with his eyes full of tears, ‘It is death for us either way. Here we have failed to get tidings of Sita and if we go home Sugriva the Monkey King will slay us.’ When the monkey warriors heard Angad’s words, they could make no answer; tears rolled from their eyes. For a moment they were plunged in sorrow; but at last they all began to say, ‘O sagacious prince, unless we get news of Sita we will not return.’ So saying, all the monkeys went to the seashore and spreading kusha grass there, sat down…The king of the bears then turned towards Hanuman: ‘Listen, O mighty Hanuman: why do you remain silent, you who are so valorous? You are the Son of the Wind and strong as your father, a storehouse of intelligence, discretion and spiritual wisdom. What undertaking is there in the world, my friend, too difficult for you to accomplish? It is to serve Rama’s purpose that you have come down upon earth.’ Hearing these words, he grew to the size of a mountain, with a body yellow as gold and resplendent as though he was another monarch of mountains. Roaring again and again like a lion, he cried, ‘I can spring across the salt abyss-it is no more than a child’s play to me!’”

After finding Sita and giving her Rama’s ring, Hanuman returned across the ocean.

“Taking a leap across the ocean, he reached the further shore and greeted his fellow-monkeys with a shrill cry of joy. They were all delighted to see Hanuman and felt as if they had been born anew…They all met him and felt as delighted as a fish writhing with agony for lack of water would feel on getting it.”

-From the Ramacharitamanasa of Tulsidas

Sources:
Prasad, R.C., ed. and translation. Tulsidasa’s Shri Ramacharitamanasa. Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi, 1990.
Sri Neem Karoli Baba Maharaj Temple Prayers. Ajanta Press, Nainital.
Tulsidas. Sri Ramacaritamanasa. Gita Press, Gorakhpur, 1999.

Sankatamochan Hanumanashtaka Part Four
Sankat Mochana, or the reliever of suffering, is one of the epithets for Hanumanji. In the Sankatamochan Hanumanashtak, written by the saint Tulasidas, there are eight verses which describe various episodes in Hanumanji’s life. Each one gives an example of how Hanumanji has used his great power to ease the pain of someone who was suffering.
The forth verse says:
Raavana traasa da-i siya ko saba
Raakshasi so kahi soka nivaaro
Taahi samaya hanumaana mahaaprabhu
Jaaya mahaa rajanichara maaro
Chaahata siya asoka so agi su
Dai prabhu mudrika soka nivaaro
Ko nahi jaanata hai jaga me
Kapi sankata mochana naama tihaaro

English translation:

Ravana ordered his demonesses to intimidate Sita, who said, “Remove my grief!” Just then you, Lord Hanuman, destroyed the mighty demons. When Sita asked the ashoka tree for a spark [to help end her suffering], you dropped the Lord’s ring down to her and removed her suffering. Who in this world doesn’t know, Monkey, that your name is Sankat Mochan, the destroyer of suffering?

This verse describes an episode in the Ramayana when Hanuman has just discovered the whereabouts of mother Sita who has been kidnapped by the ten-headed demon Ravana and is being held captive in a grove of trees, tormented by a band of female demons. Hanuman has concealed himself in the branches high above and watches as Ravana comes to request Sita to give up her loyalty to Rama and become his queen. When she refuses, the following scene ensues.

“Summoning all the female demons (posted there), he said, ‘Go and intimidate Sita in every way. If she obeys me not in a month’s time, then I will draw my sword and slay her.’ (Having issued these instructions) the ten-headed returned to his palace, while the troop of female fiends here assumed many hideous shapes and began to intimidate Sita. One of these female demons, Trijata by name, was devoted to Rama’s feet…Sita, with folded hands said to Trijata: ‘Speedily devise some plan that I may be rid of this body, for this bereavement, so hard to bear, can no longer be endured. Bring some wood and build a pyre, and then, mother, set fire to it.’ She said, ‘No fire can be had at night.’ So saying, she went away home. ‘Heaven itself has turned hostile to me!’ cried Sita. ‘There is no fire to be had and no end to my torture! Sparks of fire are visibly seen in the heavens, but not one single star drops to the earth! The moon, though all ablaze, casts no fire down, as if it knew what a luckless wretch I am. Hear my prayer, O ashoka tree; take away my sorrow and be true to your name [shoka means grief and ashoka is its opposite]. Your fresh young leaves are like flames. Give me that fire to consume my body. Then Hanuman pondered awhile and dropped down the signet ring, as though the ashoka tree had thrown a spark (in response to her prayer). Joyfully she arose and took it in her hand.”

-From the Ramacharitamanasa of Tulsidas

Sources:
Prasad, R.C., ed. and translation. Tulsidasa’s Shri Ramacharitamanasa. Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi, 1990.
Sri Neem Karoli Baba Maharaj Temple Prayers. Ajanta Press, Nainital.
Tulsidas. Sri Ramacaritamanasa. Gita Press, Gorakhpur, 1999.

Sankatamochan Hanumanashtaka Part Five
Sankat Mochana, or the reliever of suffering, is one of the epithets for Hanumanji. In the Sankatamochan Hanumanashtak, written by the saint Tulasidas, there are eight verses which describe various episodes in Hanumanji’s life. Each one gives an example of how Hanumanji has used his great power to ease the pain of someone who was suffering.
The fifth verse says:
Baana lagyo ura lachhimana ke
Taba praana taje suta raavana maaro
Lai grha Vaidya sushena sameta
Tabai giri drone su bira upaaro
Aani sajivana haatha da-i taba
Lachhimana ke tuma praana ubaaro
Ko nahi jaanata hai jaga me
Kapi sankata mochana naama tihaaro

English translation:

When an arrow struck Lakshmana’s breast his vital breath departed, struck by Ravana’s son. You brought the physician Sushena along with his house and uprooted the Drona peak. You brought the sanjivana herb with your own hand and saved Lakshman’s life. Who in this world doesn’t know, O Monkey, that your name is Sankat Mochan, the reliever of suffering?

One of the most popular visual representations of Hanumanji is the depiction of him carrying a mountain. This rupa (form) of Hanumanji can be seen in many of Maharajji’s ashrams throughout India. It reminds us that faith really can “move mountains”.

During the battle in Lanka, Ravana’s son Indrajit or Meghanada lodges a deadly Shakti weapon in Lakshman’s chest, mortally wounding him. When Rama sees Hanuman returning from the battlefield with his life-less brother, he becomes grief-stricken. Jambavan, king of the bears, says,

“’Sushena the physician lives in Lanka; who will be sent to fetch him here?’ Assuming a tiny form, Hanuman straight away went and brought him, house and all. Sushena came and bowed his head before Rama’s lotus feet, and mentioning a certain mountain and an herb thereon, he bade the Son of the Wind go and bring it.”

-Tulsidas, Ramacharitamanasa

After examining Lakshman, Sushena prescribes an herb found near the summit of Mount Drona, located 6 million leagues to the north, but the herb must be administered before daybreak or Lakshman will perish. Hanuman comes forward and growing to enormous size and manifesting fiery Rudra-energy, he promises to turn the universe upside down, if need be, to save Lakshman. The gods become terrified, fearing that cosmic dissolution may be at hand, and Rama must calm Hanuman down before dispatching him on his mission.

When Ravana hears that Hanuman has gone to fetch the herb, he goes to the sorcerer Kalanemi for help. Kalanemi constructs an illusory ashram along Hanuman’s route with a lake and temple and disguises himself as a sage. Hanuman stops there along the way and asks for a drink. The sage offers him a drink from his own water-pot into which he has mixed poison, but Hanuman says that it will not quench his thirst and asks to drink from the lake. Kalanemi tells him to bathe in the lake and then return to him and that he will initiate him with a mantra which will allow him to find the herb that he seeks. At the lake, Hanuman encounters a ravenous female crocodile concealed there by Kalanemi. She seizes Hanuman’s leg and he slays her with one blow. She reappears in the sky as an apsara who has been cursed and warns him that the sage is really a demon. Hanuman returns quietly to Kalanemi who has prepared an elaborate initiation ceremony that will last all night, but Hanuman announces that, contrary to the usual practice, he will give his “guru fee” first and receive the mantra later. Wrapping his tail around the demon, he quickly dispatches him and then continues on his quest.

When Hanuman reaches the Himalayas and locates Drona peak he sees that the whole top of the mountain glows with the pale light of healing herbs. He is uncertain as to which is required by Sushena so, in his impatience as the night is passing, he uproots the whole mountain, places it on his palm and heads back south. As he passes over Ayodhya, Rama’s brother Bharat sees his huge form passing in front of the moon and, thinking that it may be a demon, fires a blunt arrow at it. Hanuman falls from the sky and when he is revived, gives Bharat and the queens news of Rama, Sita and Lakshman. Bharat offers to launch him off on the back of one of his own arrows as it is nearly dawn and for a moment Hanuman feels self-important, wondering how a puny arrow could possibly hold the weight of himself and the mountain, and then checks himself, remembering that Bharat is after all Rama’s brother. He sets off on his own, and just as he is about to reach Lanka, Ravana, who has heard from his spies that Hanuman is returning, orders the sun god who he has defeated and made his slave to rise early. Surya begins to carry out the order and the eastern sky reddens. Hanuman, speeding towards Lanka, notices with annoyance the glow in the east and plucks the sun from behind the horizon and places it under his armpit so that its light is stifled. After he has landed and the scent from the healing herbs revives Lakshman and all the other warriors, he salutes Rama with folded palms. Rama notices a red glow coming from Hanuman’s armpit and asks him what it is. Hanuman remembers the sun and informs Rama who orders him to release the god. He does so and he and Ram both salute the sun with morning prayers.

Sources:
Lutgendorf, Philip. Hanuman’s Tale: The Messages of a Divine Monkey. Oxford University Press, New York, 2007.
Prasad, R.C., ed. and translation. Tulsidasa’s Shri Ramacharitamanasa. Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi, 1990.
Sri Neem Karoli Baba Maharaj Temple Prayers. Ajanta Press, Nainital.

Sankatamochan Hanumanashtaka Part Six
Sankat Mochana, or the reliever of suffering, is one of the epithets for Hanumanji. In the Sankatamochan Hanumanashtak, written by the saint Tulasidas, there are eight verses which describe various episodes in Hanumanji’s life. Each one gives an example of how Hanumanji has used his great power to ease the pain of someone who was suffering.
The sixth verse says:
Raavana juddha ajaana kiyo taba
Naaga ki phamsa sabai sira daaro
Shri Raghunaatha sameta sabai dala
Moha bhayo yaha sankata bhaaro
Aani khagesa tabai hanumaana ju
Bandhana kaati sutraasa nivaaro
Ko nahi jaanata hai jaga me
Kapi sankata mochana naama tihaaro

English translation:

When Ravana in battle threw a serpent noose over the heads of Rama and his whole army, all were suffering from this illusion and could not free themselves. Hanuman brought the Lord of Birds (Garuda) who devoured the serpents, cutting their bonds and averting calamity. Who in this world doesn’t know, O Monkey, that your name is Sankat Mochan, the reliever of suffering?

On the first day of his battle with Rama’s army, Indrajit was swift with his weapons. He swiftly wiped out the armies of Sugriva, calling on Lord Rama and Lakshmana to come out of hiding so that he could avenge the deaths of his paternal uncle and his brothers. When Rama and Lakshmana appeared before him, he fought fiercely, and arrested both the brothers using his most nefarious weapon-the Nagapash (a trap made of millions of snakes). Both the brothers fell on the ground breathless. They were rescued by Garuda at the behest of Hanuman. Garuda was the enemy of the serpents and also the flying vehicle of Narayana.
“Angered, Indrajit returned to the battlefield, wanting to end the war by directly attacking Rama and Lakshmana.

Being invisible, he attacked with waves of sharp arrows, as bright as lightning, which kept hitting Rama and Lakshmana. Moving all around Rama and Lakshmana, using the advantage of the night, and all his magical powers, Indrajit finally let loose a series of serpent-like arrows that pierced the limbs of Rama and Lakshmana and wound themselves around them.

These were arrows that provided the illusion of being impossible to unwind, and took on the form of live poisonous serpents. Brought down by the illusion and the pain of the arrows that had pierced them, Rama and Lakshmana were hit by more waves of the serpent- headed arrows from Indrajit, who moved about invisible, to his advantage. The serpent-headed arrows that pierced their vital organs exuded a poison that made them incapable of looking about anywhere. Weakened and helpless, the two great warriors fell in the battlefield, like flag staffs that had been released suddenly and had fallen from their stands.

At that moment, at the location where Rama and Lakshmana had fallen, the skies began swirling with clouds as a great wind arose. The clouds massed together, and lightning struck across the skies, continually and in a fearsome manner. The sea around the island of Lanka roared up in high waves, and the Vanara warriors could hear the sound and were frightened. The mountains around the city began to tremble as if there was an earthquake. Snakes seemed to come out from everywhere and escape by plunging into the ocean waters. In the midst of this thunder and storm, the Vanara warriors saw the arrival of an enormous eagle, Garuda, the son of Vinata, who glowed like a blazing torch in the darkness of the night. Merely on seeing Garuda, the serpent-arrows that bound Rama and Lakshmana turned themselves into serpents and fled away in the darkness in search of the mighty forests and the seas. The mighty eagle, the king of the birds, came up to Rama and Lakshmana and caressed their faces. With that momentary touch by Garuda, the wounds of Rama and Lakshmana were immediately healed and their bodies regained their strength.

‘I do not know why, but I seem to be as happy at seeing you as I would seeing my father, the mighty king Dasharatha. Who are you? We have never met, and yet I feel like I know you so closely. Who are you, who are so powerful, and yet endowed with much beauty? Who are you, who are so anointed, and adorned with divine ornaments?’

The mighty and powerful Garuda, the most powerful of all eagles, the king of birds replied, ‘O
Rama, I am none but your dearest friend, Garuda. To me, you are as dear as my own breath that moves out of me. I can feel and sense every breath of yours and I follow you by each breath of air that you breathe in and out.’

Rama and Lakshmana felt strong bonds of affection towards Garuda, though neither could understand the reason. They felt that they had known Garuda for many eons but could not remember any details. Garuda realized their predicament-that they could not recognize him. His very dear Lord, his very own Narayana could not recognize him. Garuda knew that he could not disclose the truth behind the manifestation of Narayana as Rama here, in this battlefield at Lanka.”

-From Valmiki’s Ramayana, retold by Bharat Bhushan in “Birds of the Ramayana”

Sources:
Bushan, Bharat. Birds of the Ramayana: Garuda, King of Birds.
Sri Neem Karoli Baba Maharaj Temple Prayers. Ajanta Press, Nainital.

Sankatamochan Hanumanashtaka Part Seven
Sankat Mochana, or the reliever of suffering, is one of the epithets for Hanumanji. In the Sankatamochan Hanumanashtak, written by the saint Tulasidas, there are eight verses which describe various episodes in Hanumanji’s life. Each one gives an example of how Hanumanji has used his great power to ease the pain of someone who was suffering.
The seventh verse says:
Bandhu sameta jabai ahiraavana
Lai raghunaatha pataala sidhaaro
Devihi puji bhali bidhi so bali
De-u sabai mili mantra bichaaro
Jaaya sahaaya bhayo taba hi
Ahiraavana sainya sameta samhaaro
Ko nahi jaanata hai jaga me
Kapi sankata mochana naama tihaaro

English translation:

Ahiravana took Ram and his brother Lakshman to Patala, the netherworld, to sacrifice them to the Goddess during a puja. Just then you went there as savior and slew Ahiravana and his entire army. Who in this world doesn’t know, Monkey, that your name is Sankat Mochan, the destroyer of suffering?

Ahiravana (“snake Ravana”) is born to Ravana’s wife Mandodari, but his serpentine appearance is so terrible that it frightens even his father, who casts him into the ocean. He makes his way to the netherworld and performs intense asceticism to please the local goddess, eventually becoming ruler of the underworld. After Ravana’s son Indrajit is killed in battle with Ram and Lakshman, Ravana remembers his other son and goes to him for help. Ahiravana devises a plan to kidnap Ram and Lakshman in the night and spirit them away to the underworld where he will sacrifice them to the goddess. He succeeds in kidnapping them and Hanuman goes after them. He plunges into the ocean and then makes himself tiny and enters a crack in the ocean floor, emerging in the sky of Patala. At the gate of Ahiravana’s city, he is challenged by a huge monkey guard who looks just like him. The guard identifies himself as Makaradhvaja (“fish-banner”), the son of Hanuman. The shocked Hanuman replies that he has been celibate since birth. Makaradhvaja explains that his mother was a fish who became pregnant after swallowing a drop of Hanuman’s sweat which fell as he was burning Lanka. The fish was later caught by Ahiravana’s servants and brought to the kitchen. When they sliced her open, a handsome monkey emerged. Ahiravana gave him his name and appointed him to guard the city. The two are obliged to fight and after a long wrestling bout, Hanuman pins his son and binds him with the youth’s own tail. Hanuman enters the city and flies to the palace, then, reducing himself to the size of a fly, he enters the temple on a flower garland that is then placed around the Goddess’s neck. He then becomes huge and presses the Goddess into the ground and takes her place. When Ram and Lakshman are brought in as offerings to her, Hanuman leaps up, grabs the sword that Ahiravana has raised to chop off Ram and Lakshman’s heads and beheads Ahiravana instead. He then takes Ram and Lakshman on his shoulders and flies back to Lanka. On the way, they free Makaradhvaja and Ram appoints him king of Patala.

Sources:
Lutgendorf, Philip. Hanuman’s Tale: The Messages of a Divine Monkey. Oxford University Press, New York, 2007.
Sri Neem Karoli Baba Maharaj Temple Prayers. Ajanta Press, Nainital.

Sankatamochan Hanumanashtaka Part Eight
Sankat Mochana, or the reliever of suffering, is one of the epithets for Hanumanji. In the Sankatamochan Hanumanashtak, written by the saint Tulasidas, there are eight verses which describe various episodes in Hanumanji’s life. Each one gives an example of how Hanumanji has used his great power to ease the pain of someone who was suffering.
The eighth verse says:
Kaaja kiye bara devana ke tuma
Bira mahaaprabhu dekhi bichaaro
Kauna so sankata mora gariba ko
Jo tuma so nahi jaata hai taro
Begi haro hanumaana mahaaprabhu
Jo kachhu sankata hoya hamaaro
Ko nahi jaanata hai jaga me
Kapi sankata mochana naama tihaaro

English translation:

You have performed many great deeds for the gods, Great Hero. Just think, what hardship is there that a poor wretch like me could have that you cannot remove? Quickly dispel, O Great Lord Hanuman, whatever afflictions are mine. Who in this world doesn’t know, Monkey, that your name is Sankat Mochan, the destroyer of suffering?